Biophotonics and Laser Science covers groups within Physics that perform experimentally based research. Biophotonics is the application of light and laser-based tools and techniques to biological systems, covering fundamental science, biological sensing and imaging, through to biomedical procedures. The application of light and laser methods enables breakthrough discoveries in biology, health and clinical sciences, and has an important role to play in meeting the grand challenges in the life sciences. Laser Science has long been a major strength of Australian Physics. We have been, and continue to be, major players in the field of laser science within Australia, particularly in the areas of experimental quantum atom optics, laser trapping, and hypersonic flow diagnostics.

The Centre for Biophotonics and Laser Science has several major programs as listed below. Our vision is to create a critical mass of researchers who can apply strong fundamental physics skills to physics or biology problems over a range of scales from single molecule interactions, through to molecules and cells, to tissues and organs. We aim to develop world-class facilities that will allow our early career researchers and postgraduate students to reach their potential and make discoveries that will contribute to the Centre becoming an international leader in biophotonics and laser science.

 

Research Groups

 

Available Projects

A “digital sundial” has recently been created using 3-D printing and open-source code [Ref: http://www.mojoptix.com/2015/10/25/mojoptix-001-digital-sundial/]. This high-tech product uses the classic...

Dr Margaret Wegener

Our project in SMP is to improve the resolution of widefield CARS microscopy by using structured illumination on the input laser beams. In structured illumination methods, used with...

Associate Professor Tim McIntyre

A composite structure made from scatterers embedded in a medium can have useful bulk optical properties. The case where the incident light exerts force or torque on the scatterers is of particular interest and will be investigated.
If the scatterers are arranged in a periodic lattice two-...

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

While optical tweezers are typically used to trap or move microscopic particles or measure piconewton forces they can also be used to measure the mechanical properties of soft particles that can be deformed by the optical forces acting on them. One example is the so-called optical stretcher but...

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

In vivo optical imaging of biological tissue can provide valuable diagnostic information such as the detection of physiological or morphological changes over time. However biological tissue is a strongly scattering medium which limits the depth to which imaging is possible and reduces contrast...

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

Measurement of the Brownian motion of particles moving freely or held in an optical trap can provide information on the viscoelastic properties of the surrounding medium on a microscopic scale. This project aims to use both conventional Brownian motion and also the random rotational motion of...

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

The ability to exert and measure forces and torques on microscopic objects offers the possibility to measure the rheological properties of tiny samples of fluids. One application with the potential to bring great social benefit is the measurement of the characteristics of natural eye fluids and...

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop